240

Freedom of Speech, by Max Brosi

Currency:USD Category:Art Start Price:150.00 USD Estimated At:NA
Freedom of Speech, by Max Brosi
SOLD
700.00USD+ applicable fees & taxes.
This item SOLD at 2015 Jun 27 @ 16:18UTC-4 : AST/EDT
All items in this auction were created, at least in part, on the wood lathe, with wood as the primary material. All are one-of-a-kind signed originals, individually created by the artist listed.
Lot #240
Freedom of Speech
Green oak, steel
7.7" x 5.5" x 4"

Max Brosi
County Leitrim, Ireland

"'Freedom of Speech' is a direct response to the terror attacks in Paris. The protrusion on one side of the piece represents a beak. The piece was turned from fresh, green oak, and the grain was orientated in a way that causes the beak to open as the wood dries, and the annual rings contract. The rusty bolts represent the attempts of some in society to close the beak and prohibit “Freedom of Speech”.

This piece was turned from cross grain green oak, with the grain oriented so the pith runs just outside one edge of the form to guarantee maximum distortion. The idea was to turn a rim around the piece, carve away all but one side of the rim, before slicing into the rim to the center of the form. This resulting "beak" will open as the wood dries and the annual rings contract. Now the beak is open. To represent the supression of free speech, I used steel bolts to give the illusion of an attempt silence the beak.

My work is constantly evolving towards a more honest, calm, and raw aesthetic. I get great pleasure from the beauty of imperfection and have been greatly influenced by the Japanese concept of Wabi-Sabi. I strive to use my experience of wood to design movement into my work by utilizing the natural tendency of thin turned wood to warp as it dries. Mostly I work in green oak, as the texture of the grain and rays interests me, especially after I sandblast the material. I work in several "series", each exploring distinct ideas. These sometimes come from a social or political perspective, but commonly are mere explorations of form and material combination."